Something-to-watch Saturday #8

It’s the first Saturday of Lockdown 2: Electric Avenue. You want some movies to watch? Then you’ve come to the right place. What follows may just be the most eclectic mix so far, because you’re worth it. #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6 and #7.

Locke (2013 – 85 mins – Amazon Prime)

Tom Hardy on his own in a car for 85 mins may sound appealing for only a certain demographic – but you’d be mistaken. This tense and taut film follows Ivan Locke (Hardy), a dedicated family man and successful construction manager as he receives a phone call on the eve of the biggest challenge of his career. A call that will set in motion a series of events that threaten his carefully cultivated existence. Written and directed by Steven Knight (creator of Hardy-starring series’ Peaky Blinders and Taboo) is fantastic thriller. If you ever find yourself in ay doubts of Hardy’s acting prowess, rectify those thoughts by watching this.

Parasite (2019 – 132 Mins – Amazon Prime)

Parasite winning the Oscar for Best Picture may have been the only good thing to happen this year (so far… *wink wink*). If you’ve not seen it yet, now is your chance and hopefully you’re going into it completely blind – which is why I’ll hold back on any plot summaries. Pop it on and watch master director Bong Joon Ho at work.

Uncorked (2020 – 104 mins – Netflix)

I strongly believe we’ve only just scratched the surface when it comes to the power of Mamoudou Athie as an actor. With his scene-stealing turn in the wonderful Patti Cake$ and an underutilised role in The Front Runner, Jurassic World: Dominion might finally propel him to the forefront. Watch Uncorked to see what I’m going on about. In Uncorked he plays Elijah, a young man balancing his dream of becoming a master sommelier with his father’s expectations that he carry on the family’s Memphis BBQ joint. A quiet yet moving drama.

Assassination Nation (2018 – 108 mins – Netflix)

You know how a film can define a particular period of time? I reckon this will be one that defines the Trump era. A blistering – very much 18-age-rating – movie set in the perpetually American town of Salem, when a malicious data hack exposes the residents secrets, chaos descends and four girls must fight to survive, while coping with the hack themselves. This is the film The Purge wishes it could be – full of rage. If cinema holds up a mirror to society then this film lets us see what we truly are, which is UGLY*. (* Yes, the She’s The Man reference was intentional – adding a bit of light relief to the cold hard truth of this film…)

Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse (2018 – 117 mins – Netflix)

Seeing this film was my all-time favourite film watching experience. At a press screening at Leicester Square Imax, surrounded my by friends, seeing a film I’d heard a lot of hype about (the US reactions dropped earlier that day) but not quite believing. The hype was real guys. Teen Miles Morales becomes the Spider-Man of his universe, and must join with five spider-powered individuals from other dimensions to stop a threat for all realities. Beautifully animated and powerfully told – this is all kinds of wonderful.

Eddie The Eagle (2015 – 106 mins – Amazon Prime)

One of the most feelgood films of the past decade, Taron Egerton is almost unrecognisable as Eddie Edwards, the notoriously tenacious British underdog ski jumper who charmed the world at the 1988 Winter Olympics. Hugh Jackman plays his coach, a composite character inspired by figures Edwards met along the way of his infamous Olympic career. Dexter Fletcher‘s film is charming, funny and totally endearing.

Plus One (2019 – 98 mins – Netflix)

Jack Quaid is currently best known for his role in Amazon’s bloody comic book adaptation The Boys, but if you fancy seeing him do something different then this, my pick for underseen romcom of the week, is the one for you. Here he plays Ben, a longtime singleton who agrees to be the plus one to his friend Alice (Maya Erskine) at every wedding they’ve been invited to, in order to help each other endure a summer of wedding fever. This one feels less like a movie, than hanging with two friends you’re desperate to get together. Understated and really delightful. (Click here to read my full review for Film Stories)

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